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‘Terry Bradshaw: Going Deep’ Clip Looks Back at Being Drafted No. 1 Overall

“I shouldn’t have been. I went to this small school and was so immature, so much to learn.”

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HBO Sports

HBO’s Terry Bradshaw: Going Deep documentary debuts Tuesday, Feb. 1 at 9 p.m. ET. The one-hour, 15-minute film combines footage from the Hall of Fame quarterback’s stage show in Branson, Missouri (with personal stories and monologues, in addition to singing and music), archival clips from his football career, and an all-new interview.

Some potential viewers might be wary of the Fox NFL Sunday analyst singing in that stage show (though he’s recorded four country albums and one gospel record), and that will distinguish Going Deep from conventional sports documentaries like previous Bradshaw chronicles in ESPN’s SportsCentury and NFL Network’s A Football Life series.

Directed by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Keith Cossrow, the documentary also includes NFL Films footage from Bradshaw’s career and an on-camera conversation with him. Both can be seen in a clip from Going Deep released by HBO on Friday. In this video, Bradshaw looks back at being selected No. 1 overall by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1970 NFL Draft.

“How did I get to be the first pick in the draft? I don’t wanna be the first pick in the draft,” Bradshaw recalls in the clip. “Looking back on it now, I’m like, ‘Oh, that’s kinda cool.’ But really and truthfully, I shouldn’t have been. I went to this small school and was so immature, so much to learn.”

Bradshaw started two seasons at Louisiana Tech, compiling 2,890 yards as a junior and 2,314 yards in his senior season. The Bulldogs went 17-4 with Bradshaw at quarterback. He went on to a legendary career with the Steelers, winning four Super Bowl championships, throwing for 27,989 yards and 212 touchdowns in 14 seasons.

Terry Bradshaw: Going Deep premieres Tuesday, Feb. 1 at 9 p.m. ET on HBO (in addition to replays on HBO channels and on-demand) and streaming on HBO Max. You can view the trailer here.

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Shannon Sharpe Apologizes to Richard Jefferson for Calling Him Lazy

Jordan Bondurant

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Shannon Sharpe

FS1’s Shannon Sharpe took to social media to clear the air between him and ESPN’s Richard Jefferson over some comments Sharpe made about the former NBA champion.

Sharpe said Jefferson was lazy for only wanting to talk about basketball. Jefferson is an NBA analyst for ESPN and doesn’t normally appear on debate shows or provide analysis on other sports.

“There is not a person in this industry since I have retired that would ever refer to my work ethic as being lazy,” Jefferson said in a response video on his TikTok. “So as long as you live don’t ever do that again or this conversation is gonna be much different.”

Sharpe saw the video and apologized saying his assessment of Jefferson was lazy.

“I want to apologize, I come to you as a man, Rich, and apologize to you for my take on what you said,” he said.

Much like Jefferson did, Sharpe then went on to break down the differences between hosts on debate shows who have to watch and study various different sports and analysts like Jefferson who only specialize in analyzing one sport.

But ultimately Sharpe wanted to bury the hatchet and make it clear to the internet that there’s no problems between the two.

“Richard and I do not have a beef,” Sharpe said. “There is nothing going on, and this is my last time addressing this issue.”

Jefferson tweeted on Saturday accepting Shannon’s apology.

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Sports TV News

NBA Sees Over $800 Million in Advertising Revenue for 2022 Playoffs

Data shows league ad sales for both Disney and Turner Sports, the NBA’s two national TV rights holders, will eclipse $1.3 billion when the playoffs and regular season are factored together.

Jordan Bondurant

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NBA Finals

The NBA and its media partners saw quite a boost in ad revenue over the course of the 2022 playoffs.

Yahoo! cited data from iSpot.tv in a recent report indicating the league saw $842.4 million in revenue for the postseason. That number was up 19% compared to last year and up 54% from 2019.

Data shows league ad sales for both Disney and Turner Sports, the NBA’s two national TV rights holders, will eclipse $1.3 billion when the playoffs and regular season are factored together. The figure makes for a 45% bump from 2020-21 and 39% from 2018-19.

State Farm, AT&T, Google Pixel and Kia Motors were the biggest ad spenders for this season. State Farm spent just over $40 million while AT&T and Google both spent over $30 million.

Despite the television viewership still not climbing back to pre-pandemic levels, the NBA has certainly kept it broadcast partners happy.

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Sports TV News

Media Rights Deals are Recession-Proof, Benefit from Longer Terms

As recently as last week, Apple and Major League Soccer agreed to a $2.5 billion deal. The NFL is mulling billion-dollar deals for just about everything, most recently the NFL Sunday Ticket package which will leave DirecTV after this year

Jordan Bondurant

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The U.S. economy may be in the “worry” phase about an upcoming recession, but if recent television deals are any indication, sports leagues are not. Media rights deals continue to skyrocket despite all of other financial indicators showing that people, businesses are currently struggling.

As recently as last week, Apple and Major League Soccer agreed to a $2.5 billion deal. The NFL is mulling billion-dollar deals for just about everything, most recently the NFL Sunday Ticket package which will leave DirecTV after this year. Those are just a couple of examples of the massive figures that seem to run counter what the average person is dealing with.

Media rights seem to be unharmed by overall macroeconomic environment. It’s interesting to look at why.

One of the main reasons seems to be scarcity. There are only so many NFLs in the world. The number might be one. If you have those media rights, you have access to a multitude of cashflow. It’s important to have the product that people want. Since people will not stop wanting their sports, it’s important to have live sports.

Also, fan participation isn’t one that seems to dwindle, overall, even in a pandemic or financial crunch. Fans care about their team, sport and the league they are in. That kind of fervor for a product makes payment to them or to whomever owns their rights to see them, a foregone conclusion.

A huge reason, also, for the value of a franchise and/or media rights deal to be largely unharmed by current economic climates is their length. Those rights are structured to be long-term and hopefully weather whatever financial crisis may be on the horizon in a hope that it is temporary.

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