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Mark Cuban: Baseball Is ‘Well-Suited For The TikTok Generation’

“He said that the league should be developing an app that takes “an AI-driven approach” to fandom.”

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Streaming deals may have older fans worried about finding their favorite teams when the new Major League Baseball season starts. One fan thinks streaming is just the tip of the technology iceberg the league should be embracing. Mark Cuban told Dan Patrick that the sport’s future should be all about social media and algorithms.

Patrick asked Cuban if he would invest in the sport of baseball if it were a product presented to him on ABC’s Shark Tank. Cuban said he would, but he would require some changes, because baseball is better built for the future than anyone realizes.

“I think baseball is well-suited for the TikTok generation because it comes in small bites,” the Dallas Mavericks owner said.

In a perfect world, Mark Cuban wants to see Major League Baseball embrace the same model as TikTok. He said that the league should be developing an app that takes “an AI-driven approach” to fandom.

“You could create an application where you could be living in Dallas, you could be a Rangers fan, but if Ohtani came up or your favorite player came up, you’d have an app where can swipe in for those plate appearances.”

Cuban wants to see baseball embrace the hand social media has dealt the sport and also make more common-sense changes to attract younger fans. He dismissed seven-inning doubleheaders and putting runners on second as nonsense.

More effective changes, according to Mark Cuban, would be eliminating throwing the ball around the horn and encouraging personality through bat flips and other celebrations.

Cuban is not advocating for a presentation based on an algorithm to replace traditional coverage of Major League Baseball. He doesn’t think any technological advancement should replace traditional linear TV broadcasts. He says that his app idea could be offered at somewhere between three and five dollars per month to better serve younger fans.

Patrick asked him why it is that the answer seems so obvious to Cuban, but it isn’t something the league has figured out.

“That’s a mystery I’ve never been able to solve,” Mark Cuban laughed.

Sports Radio News

Dan Bernstein Launching Chicago Bulls Podcast With Son

“We talk about the Bulls. We do some postgame stuff. Some pregame stuff. Anywhere you get your podcasts.”

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670 The Score host Dan Bernstein has launched a new podcast with his son, Jason, centered around the Chicago Bulls.

Organizations Win Championships podcast was launched with a debut episode Tuesday.

“It is a Bulls podcast with Dan Bernstein and Jason Bernstein,” Bernstein said. “We talk about the Bulls. We do some postgame stuff. Some pregame stuff. Anywhere you get your podcasts.”

Bernstein was pressed into giving the details by his co-host Laurence Holmes.

Jason Bernstein, a high school senior, joined Parkins & Spiegel Tuesday afternoon to discuss the new show and his potential future in following in his father’s footsteps.

“I would be open to it,” he said. “I don’t know what I want to do yet. I see my friends going ‘Oh, I wanna be an architect’ or ‘I wanna be an engineer’. Ok. I have no idea what I want to do. Well, I have an idea, but I don’t know exactly how I want to do it. I would be open to a career in sports media.”

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Sports Radio News

Carrington Harrison: USA Soccer Players Not As Popular As Olympians Due to Difference In TV Coverage

“Team sports don’t have that backdrop like Simone Biles or Mary Lou Retton is born out of you see them do a floor routine and then for eight minutes you get a story from NBC’s Tom Rinaldi.”

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The United States is moving on to the knockout round of the 2022 World Cup after a thrilling 1-0 win over Iran after Christian Pulisic’s goal. 610 Sports Radio host Carrington Harrison asked listeners whether USA soccer players were more popular than USA gymnasts or figure skaters, and he and producer Rob Brenton believe TV coverage plays a role in the popularity.

“This is why I’m gonna answer gymnastics,” Harrington said. “I think America loves certain gymnasts. I don’t know that there’s a certain soccer player the country loves. I don’t think the country loves Landon Donovan, for example. I don’t think they love Clint Dempsey. We’ll see how Christian Pulisic turns, but I don’t know that there’s an American soccer player the country loves. I think America loves Michael Phelps, I think America loves Katie Strug, or Mary Lou Retton, or Simone Biles. They’re true celebrities in that sense.

“One of the reasons why I think there’s a larger love affair with those Olympic athletes — and I don’t disagree with you — is that the Olympics has time to do narrative-driven backstories,” Brenton said.

“100 percent,” Harrison said. “100 percent. 1000 percent.”

“Not that you don’t hear backstories during the NCAA Tournament or in football, but team sports don’t have that backdrop like Simone Biles or Mary Lou Retton is born out of you see them do a floor routine and then for eight minutes you get a story from NBC’s Tom Rinaldi and you see the hard times they had growing up and you feel a connection to them,” Brenton added. “In soccer — like other team sports — it’s like ‘Oh, they made this play’ and then play goes on. Most Olympians have more love affair just in general.”

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Sports Radio News

Craig Carton: John Jamstremski ‘Shunned Me’ On Radio Advice

“I liked JJ a lot but that was not the smartest career move. I thought he went to work at McDonalds or something.”

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Craig Carton

A discussion on WFAN about whether or not Craig Carton had heard one of his producers work on the air as a host turned into Carton revealing he once tried to give advice to John Jastremski that The Ringer podcast host allegedly didn’t take.

“I once gave JJ (John Jastremski) advice and he shunned me on the insight,” Carton said.

“Really? What was the insight you gave him?” co-host Evan Roberts asked.

“The insight I gave him was — he’s not even in the business anymore, right?” Carton asked before being told that Jastremski does a podcast. “I liked JJ a lot but that was not the smartest career move. I thought he went to work at McDonalds or something. As a a manager, not like flipping burgers or anything.”

Roberts then said he’s seen Jastremski on SNY, to which Carton replied “you see lots of people on SNY, they pay like $30 a shift. Not a joke. $30 a shift.”

Carton then said Jastremski not taking his advice “irked” him.

“When you and your friends talk about football, you talk about what league?” Carton asked each member of the show, who all said the NFL. “It killed me when he would say ‘the National Football League’. No one talks like that. Nails on a chalkboard. I go ‘Listen, you didn’t ask for my advice but I’ve got a pretty good track record. Talk like normal people talk. Nobody is sitting at a bar in Staten Island saying Hey did you see what happened in the National Football League today? People don’t talk that way. You didn’t grow up talking that way, don’t do it’. And he kept doing it. It pained me to my core. It’s a stupid little thing. Talk the way normal people talk.”

Carton then concluded by saying you can ignore his advice, but he’s been number one in both morning and afternoon drive, and the only other person to accomplish that is Howard Stern. He also said he told former WFAN and CBS Sports Radio host Marc Malusis that he is better on TV than radio and should focus on TV rather than radio. Five years later, Malusis is now the lead sports anchor at PIX11.

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