Connect with us

Sports Online

Michelle Beadle Has No Regrets About Anything She Said Or Did At ESPN

“I feel like I played the game for myself the way it needed to be played both show-wise and financially.”

Ricky Keeler

Published

on

With the number of rants that people have in this business, someone is bound to say something they end up regretting later. That was not the case for Michelle Beadle during her time at ESPN. 

Beadle was a guest on The Adam Schein Podcast on SIRIUSXM and she told Schein that she never regretted any rant she ever made on Get Up! or any other ESPN show she was a part of. That includes the rant she gave about Lavar Ball because as she said, his plan ended up working.

“I don’t have any regrets on rants to be honest. I don’t feel like I was uber wrong on many of them, even the Lavar Ball thing. His plan worked, I will give that man credit. He sort of quietly slipped away and if that was always the plan, it was brilliantly played. At the time, he was obnoxious and I’m not backing down from that. We all thought that. It just happened to work in his favor.” 

Another rant that Beadle is known for in San Antonio was when she went after Kawhi Leonard in 2018 and called him an “obnoxious diva” due to the way he was acting while with the Spurs. It is a rant in which she admits she talked about him from the perspective of being a Spurs fan, yet people come up to her in Texas and tell her how much they loved it.

“That day wasn’t talking head me, it was Spurs fan me. It just sort of erupted in a way that all of it went down, I hated it.

“When I moved back here and it has been years since that rant, I would go to a restaurant and I would have somebody say we still love that. I have even forgiven everything since then.” 

As far as any regrets Beadle might have had while at ESPN, she has none because she feels things worked out for her the way she wanted them to: 

I feel like I played the game for myself the way it needed to be played both show-wise and financially. All of those things I think I played it the way I wanted to play it and that worked out for me, You’re always going to have regrets about maybe people that you trust or people you let in your inner circle, that’s life. You’re going to have that no matter where you work.” 

Sports Online

Casey Wasserman: Sunday Ticket Deal A “Transition to the Future of Media”

“I do think they go to a tech company or a someone who is solely focused on streaming those games,” Wasserman predicted. “That’s the next generation of monetization of those fans.”

Published

on

Casey Wasserman

At the annual Sun Valley Conference, an annual media finance conference, Casey Wasserman the founder and CEO of Wasserman, the owners of the largest sports agency, was in attendance.

He joined CNBC’s Power Lunch and was asked about the NFL Sunday Ticket negotiations which are still ongoing. Specifically, he was asked what would it mean if the NFL Sunday Ticket package went to a stream-only buyer like Apple or Amazon.

“I think it’s the begging of a transition to what people think the future of media is going to be like,” Wasserman said. “Sunday Ticket is sort of a precursor to streaming given that it was on DirecTV and subscription. It gives someone like an Apple or Amazon or whoever might buy it, hundreds of games a year to deliver to their fans in a very meaningful way and ways to experiment around those broadcasts”.

Wasserman was also asked if he thinks those rights will go to a streaming service.

“I do think they go to a tech company or a someone who is solely focused on streaming those games,” Wasserman predicted. “That’s the next generation of monetization of those fans. Given the 100+ million fans in the United States of the NFL, a streaming platform that has the ability to direct the focus to those games to those fans is a really powerful platform”.

Wasserman did not think there would be a surge in cord-cutting if more streaming services got into live sports. But he also added that streaming would add revenue to leagues and not detract from. “It’s a really powerful opportunity for the next 10 years. And what sports is, it’s predictable and unique in a world where almost nothing else is”

Continue Reading

Sports Online

Blue Wire, a Sports Podcasting Company, Raises $2.5 Million

Blue Wire has made progress stating it is on track to generate $10.3 million of revenue this year which tops last year’s earnings of $4.8 million and $1 million in 2020.

Published

on

Blue Wire

Podcasting is a wonderful platform of expression. The question about podcasting has always been about making it a profitable venture. Blue Wire is seeking to do that as well.

The company, which has 250 podcasts, has just raised $2.5 million of funding. Blue Wire has raised $11.4 million since it’s founding in 2018.

The company is in business with the podcasts of former NFL player Chris Long, former NBA player Richard Jefferson, Miami Heat guard Duncan Robinson and Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Maxx Crosby.

Blue Wire has made progress stating it is on track to generate $10.3 million of revenue this year which tops last year’s earnings of $4.8 million and $1 million in 2020. Kevin Jones, Blue Wire’s founder, says the company hopes to achieve profitability in 2023 where he estimates $23 million in revenue and 250 million podcast downloads.

“Purse strings are tighter,” Jones remarked. “They were a little looser in previous years, which was great for us. Everyone still has a match out there. If your company is growing fast and you have the metrics, you should be able find a handful of folks, but it’s getting harder. There are a lot more No’s and the process is going to take entrepreneurs longer to raise capital, at least that’s what we’re running into.”

But Jones has heard ‘yes’ before. Wynn Resorts invested $3.5 million in Blue Wire last year in an effort to also promote its WynnBET online sports betting product. Blue Wire has a 1,700-square-foot podcasting studio at the Wynn resort in Las Vegas, where the company tapes at least 35 hours of podcasts per week.

Continue Reading

Sports Online

Chris Berman Reflects on Early ESPN Days

“I came in to observe October 1st. I come in on October 2nd, and I go, ‘where’s Wayne?’ And they were like, ‘oh no, he just did one show so you can see how it’s done, you’re on tonight.’ I was on October 2nd, 1979.”

Published

on

Chris Berman

Chris Berman is a name that is synonymous with ESPN. There isn’t a reader of this that hasn’t mimicked his touchdown celebration or home run derby calls. He is a rarity and he joined Kenny Mayne on a recent episode of 2400Sports’ Hey Mayne Podcast.

Mayne is embarking on a new weekly flagship conversation podcast. Mayne talked to Berman about the earliest of days for the fledgling network and how his time came to be with ESPN and how the literal birthing of that network was the reason he got to be a part so early.

“We were Lewis and Clark,” Berman said. “ESPN went on the air September, 7th, 1979. I was 24, in the area, on TV, in Hartford. Right before they went on, I had an interview, then they hired me. My first day was October 1st, 1979. They said we need a junior member — I had been on TV all of three months — which was a pretty good experience at the time. Had they been on the air for a year or two, they never would’ve hired me off that…They said we’ll pay you $16,000 to do sports every night…How about $16,500?”

Berman said the newness of everything meant he was thrown to the fire very early.

“I came in to observe October 1st. I come in on October 2nd, and I go, ‘where’s Wayne?’ And they were like, ‘oh no, he just did one show so you can see how it’s done, you’re on tonight.’ I was on October 2nd, 1979.”

ESPN’s early days are a wonderful topic because for the few people there were at the network since the beginning are essentially historians of the industry. Berman went on.

“…but here we are in 2022, and they haven’t been smart enough to get rid of me yet.” Berman signed a multiyear extension ton continue hosting NFL Primetime with Mark Jackson on ESPN+.

“That’s how it was, I was in there the first month. There were about 40 to 50 of us — in all jobs — not only to get on the air, but whatever it was,” said Berman.

“Anyone that was with us in the 80s, 90s, [and] early 2000s, there will be a bond forever in that we built something pretty good. I just happened to be there on the ground floor, I was lucky, and I guess I didn’t screw it up.” 

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Barrett Media Writers

Copyright © 2021 Barrett Media.