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Chris Stigall Looks to Listen Rather Than Thinking of Next Destination

Stigall said it’s a skill to actually listen to what guests say instead of thinking ahead to where you want to go next. Then take it in a different direction that can’t be planned.

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There’s nothing worse than a guy who grows a little beard. Tufts of hair in odd places don’t scream masculinity–or even good grooming. Chris Stigall can grow a rather formidable beard, but it comes with its share of grief.

“I couldn’t believe the audacity of people who touched my beard without asking, like people touching a woman’s belly. Now I know what pregnant women mean,” Stigall said. “People wanted to comment whether I solicited their opinion or not. They’d say they dug the beard. Or hated the beard. Always unsolicited.”

He started growing the beard as a Covid protest. “I decided if people were going to act insane, I would lean in and look the part. It got pretty long.”

Stigall took his beloved beard to get trimmed. “She cut it to pieces,” he lamented. “I got really irritated. My kids pointed at me and laughed. So, I started over and shaved it down to the skin. I’ll be damned if my kids didn’t want me to grow it back. They’re used to it now.”

Stigall said he quit drinking 3 ½ years ago, and things have been better all around. “I’ve lost 90 pounds, and I feel great. Now I can wake up functioning, I sleep better, more soundly. I drank entirely too much. Almost every day.”

Since he quit drinking, he’s been more aware. “I’ve become more conscious of everything and everyone. Especially God,” Stigall said.

That awareness has caused him to see the change in humanity as of late. “I can feel the heaviness of it all,” he said. “It’s not all fun and games like it used to be. I feel there is a genuine heaviness among people today. The human spirit is in jeopardy. The collective psyche of our country has taken a lot of hard knocks. When we talk, I feel what they’re feeling.” Of course, I still want to entertain and laugh, but not for zaniness’ sake anymore. I prefer sincerity.”

Stigall’s interest in radio started in 4th grade. He remembers his parents waking up and getting ready for their day.

“My dad was shaving, and my mother was putting on makeup. They were laughing hysterically while listening to a morning show. That made such an impression on me. I recognized the power of that, and I knew I wanted to be part of it. Throughout school, any time I had a chance to announce or broadcast or address an audience, I took it.”

In high school, he tried football. His father was very good at football and played in college. Stigall said he wasn’t that interested in playing the sport but wanted to make his father proud.

“I was a big enough kid, so they put me on the line,” Stigall explained. “If you’ve played the game, you know those guys are hungry for blood, grunting at each other. That wasn’t me. I got mowed over like I was hit by a dump truck.”

Stigall realized he hated playing the sport instantly and tearfully approached his father to break the news after the first game.

“I remember his reaction so well. He asked, ‘Then why are you doing this?’ I told him I wanted to make him proud. He reminded me he never even suggested I play. Ever. It was all in my head. I learned I’m not a physically aggressive guy.”

Stigall said his parents were always supportive of his choice to go into radio. However, his father was adamant about his son finishing school.

“In my sophomore year in college, I was offered a monster 20-grand to work for a morning show in Kansas City with Randy Miller. My father went ballistic. He insisted I finish school first, so I did.”

Randy Miller was huge in the 90s, making big money. He wanted to hire Stigall to produce his show. Stigall interned with him throughout college. Stigall’s radio career has spanned over twenty years as a producer, writer, news anchor, and DJ prior to making the transition to talk radio.

Part of his journey took him to a late-night talk show.

“I was a huge David Letterman fan when I was 16,” Stigall said. “I was enamored with what seemed to be the irreverence of his show and personality. It was also the unconventionality of it all. It wasn’t racy or political. Letterman did bits like The man under the stairs. Jumping against Velcro. Throwing stuff off the roof. It was all benign by today’s standards. I also loved watching awards shows strictly for the hosts. That’s what appealed to me. The person in charge of keeping things moving.”

While in college, he learned The Late Show with David Letterman was looking for interns. He responded to the search and was rejected. They thanked him but told him they were full for the summer. He surmised they were looking for a pedigree, an Ivy League intern. Turns out they discovered over the years they preferred the work ethic of small school, Midwest kids.  

His friends encouraged him to apply again.

“I was in a conventional headspace where you only did your internships during the summer,” Stigall said. “I realized I could also take a semester off instead. I reapplied and was invited to fly out with 30 other kids.”

Stigall interviewed with Letterman’s staff, who whittled it down to 15 students, and he was one of them. Stigall interviewed every department on the show. While sitting with human resources, he was asked which department he wanted to intern.

“I told her I was just happy to be there,” Stigall said. “I knew I might get stuck in the mailroom if I sounded too aggressive. I didn’t want to make a mistake in the interview. She told me to drop the politically correct answers and just tell her which department I wanted. I told her I wanted the writing department. I interned with the writers on the show in the fall of ’98, and it was a high honor.”

He quickly learned show business is terribly cynical. Comedy isn’t all the fun and games you may think it is.

His biggest lesson with the Letterman show? Don’t meet your heroes.

“I’ll just say I had hoped to shake the hand of my hero, David Letterman,” Stigall said. That did not materialize. He figured at that moment; Letterman didn’t have a lot of time for that kind of stuff. Then the interns got a bit of good news. There was a scheduled day on the semester calendar to have Lunch with Dave.

“I thought I was finally going to meet the guy,” Stigall said. After lunch was served, his personal assistant came in and asked, ‘Ok – what questions do you have for Dave that we can answer?’ 

“I was devastated. I did meet him years later at a charity event and I told him I was once his intern. He was lovely. We took a photo, and he gave me his autograph.”

As a result, Stigall said, when he meets young people interested in the business, he goes out of his way to encourage and help them. While Letterman came up short on a personal level, Stigall admires the man’s mastery of the craft.

One of the primary components of being a good host, Stigall said, is an insatiable curiosity more than anything else.

“You have to be able to listen and react. Conan O’Brien is tremendous at it. When guests talk, he takes in every word, just waiting for a word or phrase to knock it out of the park. He hears a keyword in their response and turns that into a joke. That’s been my focus throughout my career.”

Stigall said it’s a skill to actually listen to what guests say instead of thinking ahead to where you want to go next. Then take it in a different direction that can’t be planned.

Stigall is on the air mornings from 6-9 ET in Philadelphia on AM 990 The Answer. After a short break, he broadcasts on KCMO Talk Radio in Kansas City from 10-noon CT.

“It’s really the same type of show in each city,” Stigall explained. “I keep up on the information and goings on in each city. I have very talented producers in both cities to make sure I don’t miss anything.”

He stays abreast of the national issues while his team helps him stay connected to both cities. Stigall said he repurposes a lot of information but needs the local flavor, too.

“That balance helps to get it right. I communicate with my producers by text. We know each other well enough to create a little shorthand with our messages. I’ve been fortunate with great producers.”

The business can cause you to take an inventory of yourself. Stigall talked about Michael Savage when he did a nationally syndicated show.

“There were times Savage was moody and maudlin on the air,” Stigall said. “One day, he described his audience by saying ‘the tent is empty,’ and I knew exactly what he meant. Sometimes you just feel like nobody is listening. You think, ‘it’s summer or the holidays, or people are burned out, and you convince yourself people have checked out. You feel like a psychopath just talking to yourself alone in a room some days.”

Covid has changed the way Stigall sees some things and affected the tone of many of his shows.

“During COVID, I began taking calls from people who were frightened about losing their job or those without a job. People who were genuinely terrified of illness,” Stigall explained. “Or they were scared and hurt for their kids. It was extraordinarily heavy. I personally feel I’m connecting with people like never before. Many people feel like they are in this alone.” He said many are still grieving and stunted. Covid has taken a toll on all of us.

“It seems like sometimes we’re campaigning to keep people away from each other. Psychologically I think it’s the kids who have lost the most, and we’re only beginning to understand it.” 

“I wish I could tell you that I pray every day. I hate that I don’t. That’s one thing I want to improve. I’m surrounded by a wonderful church home and pastor as well as a group of guys who meet once a week on Saturday mornings. I think it’s important we’re all a little vulnerable when we meet. There’s a value in men helping other men through their spiritual walks. We talk about our struggles in our study conversations and in prayer.”

With devotion to his faith, Stigall said he’s grateful to work for the Salem Media Group. “I’m not blowing smoke. I’ve worked for most of the broadcast companies, but Salem is the only faith-first broadcaster in the country,” Stigall said. “We’re very mission-oriented and make no apologies for that. When I signed with them, it became clear my walk with God was steering me that way. He wanted me to have a home where I was free to be fully open.” 

How do listeners in Philadelphia and Kansas City relate to his beliefs?

“I get lovely emails and notes from people who say they appreciate it. Occasionally I’ll get someone who tells me they don’t appreciate what they hear as me’ preaching.’ I earnestly never mean to sound like a sermon. I simply try to explain – when I think it fits – what carries me through when things feel bleak. If you’re lost in despair, what I now try to freely talk about is how Christ helps me. That was never something I did or was encouraged to do most of my career.” 

Stigall said he hasn’t always been on the right side of his faith.

“One of my great failings with my drinking was when I got a DUI several years ago,” Stigall explained. “Fortunately, I didn’t hurt anyone, but that doesn’t excuse it. I was mortified. When I was put in the squad car and detained, the cop was actually listening to my radio station. He recognized me. I’d never been more ashamed of myself in my life.”

He said it was a divine conversation in worship one Sunday when a sermon focused on the question, “do you truly want to get well? Do you mean what you say about your trust in the Lord?” If so, he had to get serious.

“Drinking was my escape. Sometimes the anxiety of our business can get to you. I’m not nuts about being out and social. It’s strangely difficult for me. The mixed company makes me uneasy. I figured the best way to deal with that was to get plastered and not be there. To numb myself.”

Since he’s been sober, Stigall said he’s on point at all times.

“When I’m uneasy and think I want a drink, I lean on Christ instead. I’ve never had to wake up the next morning and apologize to someone for my prayers.”

BNM Writers

WTAM Feels Like Home for Bloomdaddy

Bloomdaddy is a Cleveland-centric host dealing with issues-based topics in his new role and “from the minute I turned the mic on at WTAM, it felt like home.”

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When I first heard of a radio guy called Bloomdaddy, my mind immediately made me think of outrageous radio personalities like Bubba the Love Sponge, Mancow Muller, and DJ Sourmilk. However, David Blomquist (a.k.a. Bloomdaddy) was nothing like them. Instead, he’s intelligent, down-to-earth, and can still hit a fastball.

I asked him what I should call him. He told me David or Bloomdaddy. (There was no way I would call a grown man Bloomdaddy. Not at this stage of my life.) So, I called him David. 

“They called me Bloomer forever,” Blomquist said. “But it became Bloomdaddy when I had kids. Pretty snazzy nickname when you think about it,” he joked. “I figured I’d use it because it was memorable.”

Blomquist went to Union Local High School in Belmont County, Ohio. Just one of many little towns that make up the large school district that is miles wide. 

“It’s amazing how far buses go to bring kids in. There were only 150 kids in my graduating class, with all the areas consolidated.

Blomquist said he’d always lived in Lafferty, Ohio. It’s a coal mining town that boasted 300 residents when he was there. He said growing up in Ohio was awesome. 

“All I did was hunt, fish, ride our four-wheelers and dirt bikes. I like the city, but at heart, I’m a gravel road and cornfield kind of guy.”

I’m a gravel road and cornfield kind of guy. That has got to be the title of a country song.

He loves gravel roads and baseball.

“I walked on to the Kent State baseball team; then I quit,” Blomquist said. “It’s still the biggest regret of my life. I was a junior in broadcasting when I made the team. I realized I was going to miss a ton of broadcasting classes, including the first few each semester. At that point in my life, I just didn’t see it making sense. Part of me figured I could reschedule some classes, but it was just something I felt I had to do. It was hard to walk away, but I was overwhelmed. But it all worked out.”

Pretty mature thinking for a young man of 19 years. “I played sandlot ball from 19 until I was 37, so I got in my fair share of ball.”

He was very good at baseball but didn’t think he would have been signed as a professional. “Even the worst guy on a professional team is one of the best players in the world. It’s hard to wrap your mind around that.”

Almost every guy I’ve spoken to for these pieces had a dream of being a professional ballplayer. Blomquist is the only one who might have come close. 

He worked as a sportscaster on television for 15 years. He also anchored a morning show. Blomquist was hired at WTAM in February after host Mike Trivisonno died last October. Since he began the gig, he has kept an apartment in the city, just two blocks from Progressive Field and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

For 18 years, his radio home was WWVA-AM 1700 in Wheeling, WV. His popular morning show grew into syndication to affiliates in Pittsburgh, Youngstown, Akron, and Parkersburg, WV. 

He spends most of the week in Cleveland, then goes home to his boys. 

The paint on the new job is still wet. Before he took it, Blomquist said he needed to talk with his sons, and get their approval. 

“I wasn’t going to take the job in Cleveland unless I got the go-ahead and okay from them,” Blomquist said.

They told him to take the job.

“That either meant they wanted me to take a great opportunity or to go away,” he jokes. “I turned down a job when iHeart asked me to go to Columbus and another time to Miami. Then the Cleveland job opened up. If the job opened up ten years ago, I couldn’t have taken it. I have a baseball family; I coach baseball. It just wouldn’t have been fair to my boys.”

WTAM 1100 is the radio home of the Cleveland Guardians, formerly the Cleveland Indians. Blomquist wasn’t even in town when they changed the name of the MLB team. 

“I’m sorry they had to change the name of the team,” he said. “I know for fact  90 percent of fans can’t stand it. But they have a great young team. I’m not holding anything against the owners, but they did give into the ‘woke’ culture. You’d go to games and only see about 25 people protesting the previous name. At the time, it seemed everybody was changing names, knocking down statues.” 

You’d think something like that would be great fodder for a radio show.

“Not for me,” Blomquist said. “We’re the flagship station of the team, so we don’t talk about that. I know my parameters. The team still let fans wear the Indians gear. They aren’t required to take anything off with the name or logo.”

Blomquist said the crazy thing about the change was the fact it was named in honor of a former Cleveland player. 

“The team was named Indians after Louis Sockalexis, a former player and a Penobscot Native American from Maine,” Blomquist explained. “Apparently, a lot of people couldn’t accept the name despite it being named in honor of a Native American. The name was literally chosen to honor the man.”

In rural Ohio, Blomquist said he had a good childhood. 

“I’d say we were lower middle class and a loving family,” he said. “The loving part has always been important to me. You learn certain things from your parents, who give you an idea of who you want to be. We didn’t have any macho images around the house. We could hug, tell each other we loved them.” 

While he’s enjoyed his career, there have been a couple of speed bumps. 

About ten years ago, Blomquist commented on the air about coal miners in an area with many coal miners. He then wrote a blog on the same comment. By today’s standards, it was tame. The people that took exception were mostly the families of coal miners. He apologized to families who were upset, but it could be seen as much ado about nothing.

“It was total sarcasm. Anybody that knows me is aware of my background. My grandfather saw his brother get crushed in a coal mine. I come from a family of coal miners.”

“It started a tirade, even though it was all tongue-in-cheek.”

How anybody could see Blomquist as anything but a supporter of miners, considering his background, is ludicrous. He couldn’t be disconnected from coal miners if he tried. Blomquist’s comments would be cleared by the censor on Sesame Street when compared to things that appear on bumper stickers focused on coal miners.

“Tons of people have a sticker on their bumper reading, ‘My husband is a coal miner. There’s another sticker that depicts a guy on all fours with his head in a woman’s crotch and reads, ‘a coal miner’s job is never done.’ My comments weren’t crass.” 

When Blomquist made the comments on the air, nobody complained because they could hear the inflection in his voice. “It was when I put it on my blog in print form; that’s when everyone thought I was serious.”

Blomquist is a Cleveland-centric host dealing with issues-based topics in his new role. “From the minute I turned the mic on at WTAM, it felt like home.”

To form his daily show, Blomquist picks the four most important topics of the day. 

“They could range from Bill Cosby doping chicks, Colin Kaepernick not kneeling, something about Deshuwn Watson, or the price of soup. I kind of mold the show around those four topics. I like to get a different mix.” 

It’s somewhat surprising he ended up on the radio at all. When he was young, Blomquist looked at talk radio as dull. He was listening to heavy metal instead of Limbaugh. He wasn’t even aware of some of the big names in the business. 

“I was filling in for a talker in San Antonio. The engineer asked who it was, and I said Joe Pags. He looked at me like he’d just seen Bigfoot. He said, ‘dude, you’re going to be on national radio. That guy is huge.’”

Blomquist wasn’t star-struck.

“We all have egos in this business, but mine is in control. I want to have good shows, to entertain. I’m allergic to manual labor. If I didn’t have this job, I’d find something else.” 

He enjoys what he does. He’s been in the media business since he was 22 and said if something happened and he was no longer on the air, he’d be okay with that.

“If this ends, I’ll be working at Dick’s saying, ‘The kayaks are over there, baseball gloves are over there.’ My job doesn’t define my life. I know I’m not that good, but I work my ass off. I’ve got a three-hour show, and I’ll prepare as though it’s five hours long. I may not be that good, but I’m prepared. The way I talk about things some people aren’t going to like. That’s the way it is. I’m not going in with false information. I’m sure some guys in my position may not believe what they say, but I’m genuine. I’m not going to say something I don’t feel.” 

Blomquist said he’s liberal with some things but certainly a conservative. That doesn’t mean he carries water for anyone. 

“The Trump days are over. I know that pisses off probably 90 percent of my audience, but so be it. I feel the way I feel.”

One personality he respects is Bill Maher. Blomquist said Maher will call out the Left as quickly as he calls out the Right. 

“I think he gets more respect because he doesn’t go with the flow. I’m not going to fluff Trump 24-7. Policy-wise, I agree with him. He’s also abrasive, has a huge ego, and is an ass. Both Trump and Hilary are up there as hated politicians. Trump is number one.” 

Blomquist said his job isn’t to change minds but to put information out there.

“I say this all the time—I’m not saying I’m right, I’m saying how I feel. I think part of that comes from growing up in a small town with bikers, farmers, white-collar workers. Even when I was on television, I hung out with the guys behind the camera.” 

What’s going to define him is what kind of adults his boys will become. Blomquist said his relationships with his sons are varied, but they’re all solid. 

“I have conversations with my eldest son, and they often turn to politics. I tell him I’ve been talking about politics all day and try to find a different topic. The middle one is like Stifler from American Pie and is going to be living with me all his life. I don’t know about the younger one.” 

Blomquist made a rule a long time ago. Brothers can and will have fights, but not in his house. 

“I’m not a browbeater, but I am a disciplinarian. If you lay down the laws early, that’s good. That doesn’t mean you don’t have to give them a whack on the ass every once in a while.”

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BNM Writers

Jason Rantz Knew at Early Age Radio Career Was for Him

Rantz said the industry had changed a great deal since he began as a Dodgers-focused intern.

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Jason Rantz was an intern at 15, an unpaid gig at a sports station. He emailed the station out of the blue, asking if they had an internship available. 

“They told me they were developing a show about the Los Angeles Dodgers with an emphasis on kids, how they interacted with the game.”

Rantz said it was sheer luck. “I can’t imagine they were expecting me to do a lot of deep diving. I didn’t get paid; it was probably illegal,” he jokes. 

The Jason Rantz Show airs on 770 KTTH from 3-6 p.m. on weekdays. He’s worn every familiar hat since the internship. Rantz has worked on the producer and content side. From screener to producer to the executive producer of a syndicated show.

He knew radio was what he wanted from early on. 

“I saw entertainers, presenters in a very positive light. It’s all a performance. Our conversations on radio are not the same ones you’s have in real life. People are hopefully drawn to our conversations. Have a level of curiosity.”

Rantz said the industry had changed a great deal since he began as a Dodgers-focused intern.

“In 2022, you have to be able to write, get in front of a camera, carry a show every day,” Rantz explained. “It takes up a good chunk of your life. You sacrifice a lot of your personal time. I know the digital platforms we must use daily hasn’t worked out for a lot of people. Because of digital growth, you’re not longer able to just sit down and talk for three hours. People expect so much more from us now.”

Rantz said it’s about getting your brand, your message across all the time. 

“I do so much on the radio and know it won’t be heard again. It only airs once, and that can be frustrating. It won’t be impactful ever again. That’s why I think the other sources are so important.”

Rantz puts a lot of time into his show, and he develops a daily strategy of hitting home with content. He will write a piece early in the week. Then, give a unique analysis, talk about it on the air, and promote it through television and other platforms. 

“It’s what you have to do to remain successful. People need to think more holistically. Radio in and of itself is no longer the only way to succeed. You need to be involved in podcasts and video.”

If he’s talking about a similar topic on radio, then on the television, he doesn’t alter much. “You do have to tailor it a bit,” Rantz explained, “but I don’t change or edit much, don’t change the tone, delivery, or style.”

When somebody changes any one of those, Rantz said things are no longer authentic. “I’m not going to switch my whole tone to talk to a younger audience,” he said. “It would be quite annoying. A lack of authenticity will drive people away.”

Could he offer the same show in New York as he does in Seattle?

“I think the themes of my shows would translate,” Rantz said. “My philosophy of stories would be the same. My story selection and the stories I gravitate toward would be the same. If I talk about crime in Seattle, I’d do the same in New York. How it affects families, small business owners.”

How is Seattle different from a talk show perspective from Rantz’s hometown of Los Angeles?

“The people are so dissimilar. I think there is a passive-aggressive attitude here in Seattle that I didn’t experience in L.A. We didn’t have as many activists in Los Angeles. The Left is way more aggressive here. But I think that’s changing. It’s much more granular here than you might expect in Los Angeles.”

Rantz thinks geography plays a role in how people view stories, and the competition is much more rigorous in Los Angles.  

When we spoke, Rantz was preparing his afternoon show. The big news of the day was the FBI conducting a search warrant on Mara-Lago. I asked Rantz how he would approach the story later in the day.

“No different from anything else,” Rantz said. “I’ll consume as much as I can from various sources so I can explain what’s going on. Get a sense of reaction, formulate my opinions.”

He filled in for Ben Shapiro on the morning we spoke, so Rantz felt most of his preparation for his own show had already been done. 

“With a solo show, I’m able to pull clips from people I don’t agree with. I can look for a different opinion. Some I will find boring; others will generate a lot of reaction. I’ll see how it’s playing with conservatives and the liberal pundits.”

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BNM Writers

CBS Leads al-Zawahri Coverage

Although its weeknight evening news program regularly trails their ABC and NBC counterparts, the network led here with 4.22 million total viewers, according to Nielsen Media Research.

Douglas Pucci

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President Joe Biden announced on Monday, Aug. 1 that al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri was killed in a U.S. drone strike operation in Kabul. Al-Zawahri and the man he succeeded Osama bin Laden had plotted the deadliest attack ever on American soil — the Sept. 11, 2001 suicide hijackings. 

The president said in that evening address from the White House that U.S. intelligence officials had located al-Zawahri at a home in downtown Kabul where he was hiding out with his family. The president approved the operation in late July and it was carried out on July 31..

The networks aired this special news event on Aug. 1 at 7:30 p.m. Eastern. Approximately 17.1 million viewers tuned in to Biden’s address. As a slight surprise, the top outlet in coverage among total viewers was CBS. Although its weeknight evening news program regularly trails their ABC and NBC counterparts, the network led here with 4.22 million total viewers, according to Nielsen Media Research.

Also helping CBS was its affiliates’ usual potent syndicated programming in the 7 p.m. hour which, in most markets, is Inside Edition and Entertainment Tonight. The same goes for most of ABC’s affiliates with its combo of game shows Jeopardy! and Wheel of Fortune — the network was close behind CBS with 4.185 million viewers.

NBC trailed its broadcast competition with 2.84 million viewers.

Over on cable, Nielsen did not label Biden’s address as a separate telecast. Therefore, regular programming within that hour was still stated. Fox News Channel’s Jesse Watters Primetime easily led cable in the 7 p.m. hour on Aug. 1 with 2.8 million total viewers including 331,000 in the key 25-54 demographic. MSNBC’s “The Reidout” was a distant runner-up on cable news in total viewers with 1.35 million; CNN’s “Erin Burnett Outfromt” was second in adults 25-54 (250,000). As indicated in the rankings below, it was this 7-8 p.m. hour that was the week’s most-watched hour overall for CNN, and the week’s top MSNBC hour in the key demo.

As for the other news outlets: Newsmax’s Rob Schmitt Tonight drew 264,000 viewers; CNBC’s The News with Shepard Smith 221,000; Fox Business Network’s Kennedy 129,000; and, NewsNation’s On Balance with Leland Vittert 62,000.

Cable news averages for August 1-7, 2022:

Total Day (Aug. 1-7 @ 6 a.m.-5:59 a.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 1.413 million viewers; 199,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 0.670 million viewers; 78,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.511 million viewers; 101,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.181 million viewers; 54,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.142 million viewers; 36,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.127 million viewers; 17,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.111 million viewers; 11,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.107 million viewers; 22,000 adults 25-54

Prime Time (Aug. 1-6 @ 8-11 p.m.; Aug. 7 @ 7-11 p.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 2.098 million viewers; 268,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 0.978 million viewers; 103,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.656 million viewers; 133,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.226 million viewers; 27,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.216 million viewers; 68,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.207 million viewers; 63,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.136 million viewers; 25,000 adults 25-54
  • NewsNation: 0.060 million viewers; 8,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.058 million viewers; 8,000 adults 25-54

Top 10 most-watched cable news programs (and the top programs of other outlets with their respective associated ranks) in total viewers:

1. The Five (FOXNC, Thu. 8/4/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.300 million viewers

2. The Five (FOXNC, Tue. 8/2/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.298 million viewers

3. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Mon. 8/1/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.198 million viewers

4. The Five (FOXNC, Mon. 8/1/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.156 million viewers

5. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 8/3/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.113 million viewers

6. The Five (FOXNC, Wed. 8/3/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.112 million viewers

7. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 8/2/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.111 million viewers

8. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 8/4/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.995 million viewers

9. The Five (FOXNC, Fri. 8/5/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.892 million viewers

10. Jesse Watters Primetime (FOXNC, Tue. 8/2/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.841 million viewers

25. Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC, Mon. 8/1/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.155 million viewers

144. Erin Burnett Outfront (CNN, Mon. 8/1/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.996 million viewers

186. Real Time With Bill Maher “Episode 607” (HBO, Fri. 8/5/2022 10:01 PM, 57 min.) 0.782 million viewers

286. Last Week Tonight (HBO, Sun. 8/7/2022 11:00 PM, 35 min.) 0.577 million viewers

329. Forensic Files II “Toxic Environment” (HLN, Sun. 8/7/2022 10:30 PM, 30 min.) 0.494 million viewers

386. Full Frontal with Samantha Bee “Episode 7214” (TBS, Thu. 8/4/2022 10:00 PM, 30 min.) 0.380 million viewers

401. The Daily Show (CMDY, Mon. 8/1/2022 11:00 PM, 33 min.) 0.358 million viewers

404. Varney & Company (FBN, Tue. 8/2/2022 10:00 AM, 60 min.) 0.348 million viewers

465. Shark Tank “Shark Tank 622” (CNBC, Tue. 8/2/2022 10:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.286 million viewers

551. Deep Water Salvage “(210) Savage Salvage” (TWC, Sun. 8/7/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.232 million viewers

748. Newsnation: Rush Hour (NWSN, Tue. 8/2/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.161 million viewers

Top 10 cable news programs (and the top  programs of other outlets with their respective associated ranks) among adults 25-54

1. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 8/2/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.508 million adults 25-54

2. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Mon. 8/1/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.478 million adults 25-54

3. The Five (FOXNC, Thu. 8/4/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.465 million adults 25-54

4. The Five (FOXNC, Mon. 8/1/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.438 million adults 25-54

5. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 8/4/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.428 million adults 25-54

6. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 8/3/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.400 million adults 25-54

7. The Five (FOXNC, Tue. 8/2/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.399 million adults 25-54

8. The Five (FOXNC, Wed. 8/3/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.394 million adults 25-54

9. The Five (FOXNC, Fri. 8/5/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.374 million adults 25-54

10. Gutfeld! (FOXNC, Tue. 8/2/2022 11:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.369 million adults 25-54

44. Erin Burnett Outfront (CNN, Mon. 8/1/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.250 million adults 25-54

55. Last Week Tonight (HBO, Sun. 8/7/2022 11:00 PM, 35 min.) 0.228 million adults 25-54

77. The Reidout “Biden On Klng Of Al Qaeda Leader 732-739” (MSNBC, Mon. 8/1/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.198 million adults 25-54

99. Forensic Files II “Toxic Environment” (HLN, Sun. 8/7/2022 10:30 PM, 30 min.) 0.186 million adults 25-54

117. Full Frontal With Samantha Bee “Episode 7214” (TBS, Thu. 8/4/2022 10:00 PM, 30 min.) 0.165 million adults 25-54

135. The Daily Show (CMDY, Thu. 8/4/2022 11:00 PM, 30 min.) 0.151 million adults 25-54

178. Real Time With Bill Maher “Episode 607” (HBO, Fri. 8/5/2022 10:01 PM, 57 min.) 0.131 million adults 25-54

245. Shark Tank “Shark Tank 621” (CNBC, Thu. 8/4/2022 11:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.116 million adults 25-54

583. Deep Water Salvage “(210) Savage Salvage” (TWC, Sun. 8/7/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.056 million adults 25-54

790. Varney & Company (FBN, Fri. 8/5/2022 11:00 AM, 60 min.) 0.034 million adults 25-54

816. Newsnation: Rush Hour (NWSN, Tue. 8/2/2022 6:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.029 million adults 25-54

Source: Live+Same Day data, Nielsen Media Research

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