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Dave Ramsey Never Wanted To ‘Do Radio’

That is the legacy, to date, of The Ramsey Show and Ramsey Solutions, which has helped people get out of debt and become financially independent for 30 years.

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You can touch a lot of lives in the course of the day if your goal when waking up is to help and serve as many people as possible. And you can help, counsel, motivate and love untold numbers of people when you build a team to share that aim, and you do so for nearly 11,000 days. That is the legacy, to date, of The Ramsey Show and Ramsey Solutions, founded by Dave Ramsey, which has helped people get out of debt and become financially independent for 30 years.

Last week, the show released a bonus episode on YouTube and podcast, with the current team of Ramsey personalities reminiscing with their leader, Dave Ramsey, on the evolution of the program, and its mission, over the last three decades.

The show began 30 years ago when Dave Ramsey made a guest appearance on a friend’s real estate program on a local Nashville radio station. The host of the show quit shortly thereafter, and Ramsey was asked if he wanted to take over the time slot.

“I’m not doing radio,” Ramsey said at the time. “Radio people don’t get paid nothing. They’re like bankers – big egos and titles and no money. I need money. I am broke, my kids are hungry. I am not doing this.” Ramsey had just gone through bankruptcy, after watching his personal real estate empire crumble, leaving his family in financially dire straits. He had emerged with the goal of helping others avoid the pitfalls and pain he had brought on himself.

Eventually, Ramsey agreed to host the radio show a couple of days a week as a way to promote his self-published book, Financial Peace, which he was promoting and selling out of the trunk of his car. Ramsey said the awful Money Game program was “hillbilly, red-neck radio.” In time, Ramsey took over the program on his own and re-branded it The Dave Ramsey Show, based largely on the example laid out by other top radio stars, such as Rush Limbaugh and Dr. Laura Schlessinger.  

“We shifted everything to Dave Ramsey, branding off the single person brand. And then everything drove through that brand,” Ramsey recalls. “That focus is what helped us move everything. Events, books, website started working. It was in the early days of the web.”

About fifteen years ago, the brand began to look toward the future, branching out to include multiple personalities and building an eventual succession plan.

“In my mid-40’s I said this thing’s not going to outlive me if we don’t decide how we’re going to carry the message in the next generation,” Ramsey said. “As we started thinking about that we said well, we don’t really say anything that’s unique. Lots of people have said, live on less than you make, get on a budget. You know, lots of articles that were boring, written by boring financial people.

“The only thing that’s unique is that we actually love the people. We actually care about people, and we actually help them. We’ve got compassion for them and we’re sassy and smart-aleck and funny and tell stories and entertain and convince them in the midst of that to go through their transformation. So we realized at that point that the business, the whole thing we built, would just die with me if we didn’t have other people that could do the same thing.”

Enter new personalities, such as those who appeared with Ramsey on the special 30th Anniversary episode – his daughter, Rachel Cruze, Ken Coleman, Dr. John Delony, George Kamal and Kristina Ellis. 

When listeners visit the Ramsey Solutions headquarters in Franklin, Tennessee, they are greeted like friends, with Janelle graciously checking them in and offering them a cookie and cup of coffee.  Over three decades, the radio program – like the brand itself – has become much more than a radio show about money.

“I would say it’s a place that people call in with their questions about their life, and it’s more heavily geared towards money. But yeah, it’s just a couple people sitting in a radio studio, friends, and taking people’s calls.” Cruze said.

“We’re kind of diving into whatever mess is going on in life and going, here’s how we can help,” Kamel interjected.

The program has evolved into areas such as relationships, boundaries, career growth, mental health, college planning and small business building.

“The pressure for someone to call in live on the air and talk to somebody, that’s a terrifying proposition for a lot of people, so there’s that,” said Coleman, who focuses heavily on his role as a career coach. “And then they’re dealing with something where they go, I feel like I need a breakthrough. And so, regardless of the topic, like Rachel said, it’s just a real person with a real struggle who needs real help.”

In addition to the flagship Ramsey Show, many of the personalities now also host individual podcasts, which focus on their specific areas of expertise. And during this special anniversary episode, the hosts recalled some of the more memorable calls they’ve taken on the air. From the hilarious to the emotional, Ramsey and his co-hosts have tackled it all on the air over the years. 

The man planning to get out of debt. 

The war vet dealing with PTSD. 

The college student searching for Biblical principles for handling money.

The millionaire developing a plan to become incredibly generous.

The main considering installing a pay phone in his home.

The brother forming a business partnership with his sibling.

The frightened mother cowering in a back room, hiding from her angry and violent spouse.

“I remember the first couple of calls I took on my podcast, and it came out organically. My first response to their question was, why are you calling me? That’s a huge thing. Why haven’t you called your friends or your pastor or your family members?” Dr. Delony recalled. “And to a person every response was, dude I got nobody. Like, you’re the only person to call. And so if you’d have asked me right when I was starting, what is the role of the show, how do I explain it? I would have said it’s a show people call about life.

“Now I think my answer would be different. It’s – We’ll Be There. When you’ve got nobody, we’ll be honest with you. And we’ll tell you what we think. We think we’re pretty smart. We think we know what we’re talking about, but we’ll be honest with you.”

In many respects, the Ramsey Show has become a place where callers can talk about subjects they may not even feel comfortable discussing with their own friends and family. After all, money conversations can be sensitive.

“I also think it’s just like a safe space. These topics we talk about, sometimes there’s a stigma around them. People feel shame and they feel intimidated to talk to their friends and family. It’s like this is a spot where we’re comfortable with this,” Ellis said. “You can bring us your ugly stuff. You can bring us the things that you don’t want to mention to anyone else and we’ll work through it.”

It’s a long way from the “awful, hillbilly program” on local Nashville radio. But through constant growth and evolution of the program and the organization, the company has helped countless people around the country and around the world. And judging by the trajectory, this group plans to help a whole lot more over the coming decades.

“The thing is when you tell people the truth about how to get a job, or the truth about, here’s how you do this relationship, or the truth about what you got to do with your money, they hear it even if they don’t like it,” Ramsey summed up. “Truth has a way of getting to you. And they know you love them. And we love them. We care about them.”

BNM Writers

Sara Carter Digs For The Underreported Stories

“We focus on a number of different underreported stories. We’ve released two episodes and are getting ready to release the third.”

Jim Cryns

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Sara Carter is an apex predator. As fierce as a mother badger defending offspring. Carter can intimidate the crap out of you, and will have no respect for you if you don’t hold your own ground. She speaks with such force, I urged her to avoid having a stroke.

After talking with her for half an hour, I found a chink in her armor. It took all that time to unearth her softer side.

“I love The Sara Carter Show,” she exclaimed. “It’s serious, funny, and we have great guests. Luis Elizando is a fantastic guest. Our show isn’t all political. Luis is a friend of mine and he’s talked to us about the mysteries out there we have no answers to. I like to have Gordon Chang on, to talk about what’s going on with China.”

Carter isn’t opposed to bringing on a chef to the show sometime. Deal with topics that aren’t always so dire and distressing.

“Maybe I’ll have Donald Trump on the show and give him the Pepsi Challenge,” Carter jokes. “See if he can identify his beloved Diet Coke.”

Carter said when she can, she likes to take her show to a lighter area.

“I love talking with attorney general Mark Brnovich about his being a Star Wars fan. I am too. We have Star Wars themes around the house. I love all the movies in the series. That’s something people might not know about me. I love the show What on Earth on Discovery. I love the series and the science. Fascinated by the universe. I love science fiction. I’m not into the mystical stuff, but I love Star Trek.”

Carter also loves to cook and knows all her mother’s recipes. All the Cuban cooking. I asked if she could make a good tamale. She can’t. But Carter said a lot of families do make very good tamales, recipes that are revered. Families take pride in their tamale recipes.

Carter is also a serious actor. The last big role she performed was Portia in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice. 

“That was my favorite role,” Carter said. “I also played Laura Manion in Anatomy of a Murder.”  In the film version, this was the role played by the beautiful Lee Remick.

 “I made choices in regards to playing Laura. I lost myself in that character. In the movie she was portrayed as a sexy siren. Wore revealing and provocative outfits. I chose to wear modest clothes as my costume. Sexy, but not over sexy. I was attractive, but not over the top attractive. I kept it in the center. I used to do plays all the time in college. I love reading. I just finished. Empire of the Summer Moon by S.C. Gwynne. It’s a brilliant book.”

Now we can visit the hardcore Carter. The apex investigator that is reluctant to take prisoners.

Carter is an award-winning investigative reporter who says she ‘takes back the story.’

Each week Carter shares her unique perspective as a mom, a wife to a wounded war hero, and a reporter who’s told stories from the darkest corners of the world.

Dark Wars: The Border is Carter’s 10-part series on the border between Mexico and the United States.

“I’m so excited about my new podcast and we’ve been talking about it for quite a while.,” Carter said.  “We focus on a number of different underreported stories. We’ve released two episodes and are getting ready to release the third.”

The first episode is titled Behind the Border Lie. The second episode, China is the New Cartel, and the third is coming out soon. Carter said they will try to release a new story every couple of weeks.

“We have a great team working on our show,” Carter said. “This feels like such an important series of stories. Our focus is not just on the number of people coming across the border. We want to take the stories to another level. We talk with our neighbors to the south trying to find solutions.”

Carter said she’s attempting to lay out the groundwork for the entire series. She’s gone to Guatemala, El Salvador in search of answers.

“As I learned about the wall, I’ve realized It’s not just a 2,000 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico,” Carter said. “The border issue affects every single American. Are we dealing with parent’s loss of their kids to fentanyl? I don’t think we cover that side of the story enough. These drugs are being sold in underground markets of horrors. I want people to understand every single one of us is affected by these issues.”

This country has difficulty coming to consensus as to how to battle problems like the border and drugs.

“I think politics always plays a role,” Carter explained. “I can tell you this isn’t just about Joe Biden. I remember when I first started covering the border under the Bush administration. I”d break all these stories while working for the Daily Bulletin. My stories have led to a lot of congressional investigations.”

Carter, a fine writer, captures subtle nuances in her stories, evident in this clip from “Beyond Borders” about the border.

“Dilapidated corrugated steel fencing salvaged from Vietnam flanks the opening. The gulch envelops those who stay there. It twists its thorny desert branches around them, depleting their spirits and taunting them with the mesmerizing lights of a city out of reach. The migrants who call “Smuggler’s Gulch” home for months at a time watch and wait amid bad company, as smugglers of humans and drugs also call the canyon home. Those waiting to cross say corrupt Mexican state police and military personnel are among them.

Carter said the lack of national security along the Mexican border is of great importance to her. The growth of the cartels is also a concern.

“I was tough on the Bush administration with these issues,” she said. “Tough on the Obama administration as well. I worked well with the Obama administration when I worked for the Washington Times.

It seems to Carter, no administration has been able to effectively battle the drug issue or border issue efficiently.

“I feel the Trump administration finally clamped down,” Carter said. “It might not have been perfect, but at least he was holding  people accountable. It’s the people who are being lied to,” she said. “The American people. It’s a criminal crisis. A humanitarian crisis. If we don’t tell the truth as to what is happening, who will?”

In episode 2 of Dark Wars, Carter directs her focus, vitriol, and energy toward China.

“They are our adversaries,” she said. “China has taken advantage of all the chaos in the world. China is capitalizing on our border crisis. The Chinese government is aware the Mexican Cartels are manufacturing fentanyl, sending it to the United States. “The Chinese government is smart when it comes to playing this game of chess,” Carter said. “The Chinese are allowing Mexican cartels to benefit. The U.S. treasury has written a report on this.”

Carter said she’s spent time visiting shelters for victims of human trafficking, talking to young boys and girls. 

“That’s the impetus of the work I’m doing right now. These children have confronted the most horrific monsters we can imagine.”

When she talks of the drug crisis, you can hear the empathy in her voice. “We lost 107,000 people to fentanyl last year alone,” Carter said. “Kids being poisoned.

Her mother was a daughter of the Cuban revolution, and her father died when she was just 13 years-old. People like her mother worked their tails off for a better life in the United States.

“There’s a lot to fight for here,” Carter said. “I watched my mom work hard like all Americans. I recall my mother coming home from her work at the factory. Her hands would bleed from all the chemicals she worked with on a daily basis. Her job was to assemble airline parts at a rubber company. I was always so proud of her and heartbroken at the same time. She loved this country and always told me if I worked hard I could do something with my life.”

If Carter could have a blank check to fight the border crisis, importation of drugs, she said she would first designate the very dangerous, target the biggest cartels.

“It’s time we label cartels terrorist organizations,” Carter said. “We have to disrupt their chain of finances, get cooperation from our neighbors. I think we’ve made a huge mistake ignoring the problem for too long. I don’t think it’s too late. I don’t think we can afford for it to be too late.”

Despite the daunting and heavy topics Carter addresses, she’s still got hope.

“I wouldn’t visit the sex trafficing sites if I didn’t have hope,” Carter said. “I tell these victims we’re not going to forget their stories. I want the cartels to know that it’s not just me, but all the mothers and fathers around the country will hold them accountable for what they’ve done to our children.”

Carter said manufacturing needs to be brought back to the United States.

“We should be the envy of the rest of the world. Trump had started to change things. I wish some things he’s done were different. I wish he had held firm on Title 42. Perhaps he could have focused more on Central America. Let them know we were done supplying them with money as other administrations had.”

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BNM Writers

News Media Has Share of Blame in Kanye West’s Behavior

Kanye West says things, does things and waits for the response. The news media often cause that response or at least the magnitude of that reaction.

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Kids make me laugh. More accurately, little kids make me laugh and why not? 

When they do things that are silly or funny or often just plain wrong, I smile and sometimes giggle, or even once in a great while, I will bust out in hysterics and fall to the floor. 

(A heads up though, kids…you better be talented and have done your homework if you want to see that happen.) 

I constantly break the parental rule of reacting when the toddler or the youngster misbehaves or mouths off in that innocent yet evil child manner, much to the chagrin and annoyance of the kid’s moms or dads.  

“Please don’t encourage him.” “Just ignore her, we don’t want her to think that’s okay or acceptable.” 

Too late. 

The child’s reaction to my reaction is usually worth the scorn I get from the adults. Plus, the kids, they do love attention. Children thrive on it. 

My kid is 22 now but there are some great memories, some involving the cat when she was a toddler. 

(Shut up, the cat lived a full life, and the evidence still lives on my Instagram if you’re really curious) 

Funny is funny, real is real and I’m getting older. Besides, you are not supposed to stifle a sneeze either, right? 

Point? 

Kanye (Ye) West is not a child, and we, the news media, are not his parents or his parents’ friends.  

In many ways, though, we in the news can be accused of being the bad adult reacting to the child, but in this circumstance, there may actually be some harm being done. 

Mr. West is also not funny…except perhaps in the clever jokes made about him but that praise and the credit goes to others. 

West is an adult and a businessperson and an artist.  

He is an entertainment figure.  

He says things, he does things, and he waits for the response. We, the news media, are often the cause of that response or at least the magnitude of that reaction. 

If the lady who owns the shoe store down the block did and said the same things, maybe a half dozen people would know and fewer would do anything but shake their heads and keep walking. 

We, as in us, are making it seem like we care because we constantly report it. We give Mr. West more attention not any less for the content of his platforms but equally for his antics. 

Unlike Alex Jones, West is not on trial or involved in significant legal proceedings where the names and faces of others have become public or associated. This could always change but for the time being, we may draw a division of sorts in news coverage of what West says and does and what Alex Jones has involved himself in recently and over the years. 

(A couple of months ago, I maintained that we should not turn our backs on Mr. Jones’s impromptu news conferences on the courthouse steps during his civil trial as they were part and parcel of coverage of the legal proceedings. I still see no reason to alter the position.) 

These are both men who want attention and if you strip away the coverings and decorations in the way they choose to go about achieving notoriety, they have significant similarities. 

This is not and should never be about censorship or ignoring what’s happening. It goes back to impact and interest. The two are not mutually exclusive, in fact, they work as a team. The news media can try and predict the impact of a story, but the interest must belong to the audience. 

The easy answer or rationale for what we do cannot always be because it involves a celebrity.  

It’s too easy. 

There will be instances where coverage of Kanye (Ye) West will be timely and appropriate for regular news programming but most of the time, we can exceed even our own expectations. 

The truth is we put this crap on the air because we think people don’t know or want any better. 

I say we’re wrong. 

Save what this guy says and does and what people like him do for the outlets that make their money and reputations covering this type of thing. 

It’s costing us too much in the long run. 

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BNM Writers

Doug Hamand Leads Cumulus Programming With Radio Wisdom Learned From Several Cross Country Stops

“Radio is a small, small world. Everybody knows everybody. You’ve got to be careful. Don’t be a crappy person, don’t blow your chest out when you’re doing well.”

Jim Cryns

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Doug Hamand is a man who likes to plant roots. Early in a radio career, you’re required to move around more than an Amazon worker in a warehouse. You just don’t have the luxury to call your own shot. As you progress in your career, you make choices that better suit a family.

Hamand is currently Vice President of Programming Operations for Cumulus in Atlanta, and has held that position for seven years. Before that, he held a similar position with iHeart in Tampa for more than 21 years.

The cool thing for Hamand about the switch from Tampa to Atlanta, among other things, was the wonderful fact didn’t have to physically move.

“I was asked when I interviewed for the Atlanta job how important it was for me to stay in Tampa,” Hamand said. “I told them it was very important. We’d been here a long time and didn’t want to start over. It’s also more expensive to live in Atlanta, and you can’t replace this winter weather with anything better.”

Doing a job from a distance isn’t as hard as it once was. “During the pandemic, we closed a lot of the offices,” Hamand said. “We’re on Zoom and video meetings all the time. Everything I need to do I can do from here. I don’t get the interruptions like I used to. I don’t get people sticking their heads in the doorway wanting to talk.”

That doesn’t mean Hamand didn’t welcome and enjoy helping people, he did and still does. But without being physically in the same office with 100 people, it makes it easier for him to attend to the nuts and bolts of his job, the revenue and ratings part, without interruption.

The way people have meetings all day via the web has changed that aspect of his career, Hamand said the way talent searches for a position has changed as well. The days of the manila envelope containing a typed resume and a cassette air-check are over.

“Today, they’ll send me an mp3, or a link to their website,” Hamand said. “I can immediately hear whether they’ve polished their craft. They can send a good resume and a solid cover letter by email, but I’ll know in the first 30 seconds of listening to their demo if it is right for me.”

How does he know? Hamand said he judges a candidate by tempo, how they deal with the listener one-on-one. The uniqueness of their delivery is considered. Hamand looks to see if they’re creative, and if they’re funny out of the gate.

“Its’ all those things,” Hamand explained. “Sometimes they may not be exactly as they presented themselves. When I get down to the final three applicants, I’ll have them send me three unedited shows. I can judge who they are by that point. A true feeling.”

We discussed big stations flipping formats and what that might mean in Atlanta.

“I can’t speak to some markets but nothing like that is happening here,” Hamand said. “I’ll tell you what scares the heck out of me. By 2023, Ford F150 trucks will no longer have the opportunity for owners to listen to AM radio.”

Some people are concerned the removal of AM radio presents a safety risk to the public.

Pete Gaynor, the former Acting Secretary of Homeland Security and administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said AM stations play a “particularly vital role” in the National Public Warning System “as many AM signals can be received at great distances, which is critical when disasters impact entire regions.”

Granted, a lot of our big news/talk people are on HD2, but we have to teach listeners what that means.

“A lot of television stations had the right idea when they just shut analog off and forced people to go digital,” Hamand explained. “I don’t know if radio can pull that off. You’re converting an entire audience. Have we done a good job as an industry with this? Not really.”

Born in Emmetsburg, Iowa, Hamand said he listened to a lot of radio, like CKLW out of Canada after the family moved to Detroit. “It was just over the border. Big 8 was a top 40 station.  He listened to a bit of Howard Stern as a kid on WWWW-FM.

The family moved to Canon City, near Denver.

“My stepfather had family in Colorado,” Hamand explained. “Canon City was a small town, but it was a lot of fun. In junior high school I took theater and speech classes.”

Hamand said there was a jock at the local KRLN who invited him in for a tour. That changed everything for him.

“It was weird, shag carpeting over the walls. A quarter was on one of the needles so it wouldn’t pop up. It wasn’t really what I was expecting, not nearly as cool as I thought it would be when you’re listening on the radio.”

Aesthetics aside, Hamand was hooked. He became friends with the DJ and started going to the station during his junior year during his first hour.

“It was just up the street,” Hamand said. “He let me hang out and watch, learn as much as I could. I would play carts, set up records.”

Finally, the big break.

“I got to out-tro ‘Sister Golden’ Hair by America. My stomach was in knots but it was amazing.” Hamand started filling in for some air shifts during his senior year. After graduation, while also working part-time at an auto store, he worked some more fill-in shifts. I knew this was going to be my thing. I started working at 96 Rock in Colorado Springs under a program director named Chuck Finney. He was having a meeting and I overheard him talking about ratings. I was just in there looking for carts and stuff.”

Hamand was curious and joined the conversation.

“I asked him what a ‘cume’ was,” Hamand said. “Chuck took the time to explain the ratings system to me. I always thought that it was nice of him to take the time to do that, describe the ratings aspects to me.”

He worked for a while in Vail, then it was back to Lakewood/Denver, Colorado and a startup station, KQKS where Hamand did nights.

“I enjoyed six amazing years there,” Hamand explained. “We were a real ratings success. In those days I’d earn more doing radio appearances at venues than I’d make on the air in salary.”

Hamand still gives students a tour of radio stations when time permits. He considers it paying back.

“That’s how I got started, a tour of a radio station,” he said. “It was a pivotal moment for me. When radio stations have glass around the studios and people can watch the talent do their stuff, that’s a lot of fun. That’s entertainment. It can be a worm and hook for a young person to get into the business.”

From Lakewood it was on to West Virginia and a morning show in Charleston. Hamand said it was all good fun, but it was still a job.

“Here I was with my first daughter in kindergarten and I was getting up before 4am to do a show,” Hamand said “Then I’d get home around 8pm, and do it all over again. You don’t think of it, you just do. There’s a fire burning in you and you do what you need to. You do pay a price.”

Then it was off to Lexington, Kentucky.

“I thought I knew everything by this point,” Hamand said. “I had the proverbial playbook memorized. But that was when things changed. I realized I was a better coach than I was on the air. I think I had good vision. I put the Ben & Brian show together back in the day.”

Hamand explained how Ben and Brian were working at two separate radio stations in Knoxville, Tennessee.

“I knew if I could get these guys together, they’d be great,” Hamand said. “I talked with each of them and they agreed to meet with me. I put them together in a hotel room with a white board. I told them when I came back after the weekend, if one of them were dead, we would know they wouldn’t have been able to work together.”

They got along famously, and their career together took off. He struck gold again with Bandy and Bailey, another successful morning duo. What does he look for when mining for a new show?

“I listen for comedic value and timing when considering talent,” Hamand said. “I see if they can find the ‘out’ to a segment. It’s easy to get ‘in,’ but I need to hear the middle as well. There’s a real story arc. Of course the chemistry has to be there.”

Hamand said a PD can’t be afraid to dump something if it’s not working. And they don’t hesitate. They can’t afford to.

“I had one show recently where it just wasn’t working. They weren’t talking off the air and it was blatantly obvious it wasn’t cordial on the air. The show was horrible.”

Hamand said a new team may get 90 to 100 days to improve, but there’s no time to let a horse with a broken leg continue on. You have to put it out of its figurative misery. There comes a time when you have to punt and absorb your losses.

Everybody knows getting canned is part of the radio business. Many station owners and management won’t allow their talent to say goodbye to their audiences, like the recent explosion of KGO in San Francisco. The management didn’t let any of their talent sign off. Hamand said that decision for him is made on a case-by-case basis.

“If I trust them, I’ll let them say goodbye,” Hamand said. “Radio is a small, small world. Everybody knows everybody. You’ve got to be careful. Don’t be a crappy person, don’t blow your chest out when you’re doing well.”

Hamand said overseeing talk, music and sports requires different techniques. Each has their own challenges.

“I always say if you’re brilliant in basics you’ll win,” Hamand said.

When he looks for a talent, he goes primarily for the personality. “I do like the loud guys, but when they start to scream, that doesn’t work for me,’ he explained. “I also like some low-key shows. It isn’t a one size fits all thing. Here in Tampa, there is one person that screams at the Tampa Bay Buccaneers all the time. I’m thinking, they are not listening, it’s just me. Tone it back.”

There’s no question listeners are changing how they ingest their content, it’s morphing daily.

“We still rule the car,” Hamand said. “It’s like the situation with the Ford truck. A listener doesn’t feel the need to figure all that out, they just know they want what they want at that moment.”

“We need to find a way to fuse it all together,” Hamand explained. “It’s all a tender balance.”

When working with his on-air people, Hamand said they need to hit core topics every 10 or 15 minutes to stay fresh for the listener. He’s not a believer in long teasing.

“If you’re going to tease information, make it realistic. Don’t make the tease last three hours. I had a situation with a morning guy who would wait two hours to pull a trigger. You can’t do that, just pay off the damn tease.”

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