Connect with us
BSM Summit
blank

Sports Online

Ron Cey Launching Sports Talk Show

“Ron is entertaining! He brings his expertise and unique perspective to radio and is ready to talk about sports, newsmakers and tell stories that will inspire you!”

blank

Published

on

blank

Baseball legend Ron Cey is launching a digital sports talk show with CRN Digital Talk Radio.

We’ll See About That with Ron Cey will air Saturdays at 2:00 PM ET on the digital network.

“One of the iconic stars of the Los Angeles Dodgers and a fan favorite on any team, we are thrilled to have Ron Cey join the CRN team,” CRN Digital President and CEO Michael Horn said. “Ron is entertaining! He brings his expertise and unique perspective to radio and is ready to talk about sports, newsmakers and tell stories that will inspire you!”

Cey’s debut show will feature a conversation with Jaime Jarrin. Jarrin is a Dodgers Hall of Fame inductee and recently retired after spending 63 years as the team’s Spanish radio announcer.

Sports Online

Chris Berman: NFL Primetime ‘High On My Professional Tombstone’

“I talked to Jimmy Pitaro 3-4 years ago. I said if you could convince the league to bring it back, I’ll come back.”

Avatar photo

Published

on

blank

From 1987-2005, football fans had to run to their television sets every Sunday night during the season to catch Chris Berman host NFL Primetime on ESPN to find out what the results were of the other games that Sunday and in its early stages, it was an important show to the football community.

Berman was a guest on The Adam Schein Podcast this week and he said that he learned very quickly how important NFL Primetime was to people in the game including the late legendary head coach Don Shula.

“We realized that we had a connection to the football community…I very quickly learned that the highest ups in the community, meaning an owners meeting in 1988, Don Shula came over and he said Chris, I use your show sometimes to get a look at some other teams…I’m learning this as we are going on and I realize not I’m important, it’s important.”

Even though NFL Primetime can’t exist on cable TV anymore due to NBC having the rights to Sunday Night Football and having the Football Night In America pregame show, Berman did say he told ESPN president Jimmy Pitaro that if NFL Primetime could come back in some way, he would come back.

“I am thrilled we are still doing it today. We can’t do it on regular TV. NBC owns the rights back when they got the rights to Sunday Night Football. The fact that on ESPN+ is the only place it could live.

“I talked to Jimmy Pitaro 3-4 years ago. I said if you could convince the league to bring it back, I’ll come back. We got Tommy [Tom Jackson] to come back the first year and Booger [Booger McFarland] is Tommy 2.0. Booger’s great. We have fun.

“Back then, if we needed 7 minutes for Seattle-Arizona, we could. The rules — I don’t know why — we can’t go over 3 minutes. I love doing it every Sunday, I’m glad people like watching it.” 

At the same time, Berman did say he was “pissed” when he found out at the time that NFL Primetime was over.

“Pissed. It’s the favorite thing that I do. I’ve had some other moments, but if you asked me what’s the most fun I’ve had on a consistent basis…As far as going to work on a regular basis, NFL Primetime, that would be high on my professional tombstone I would think.”

In addition to NFL Primetime, Berman is also well-known for making predictions on Friday nights on SportsCenter as the Swami before the days where sports gambling was legal like it is now in some states. He told Schein that nobody told him he couldn’t do something with that segment, but he would never tell somebody to take the points.

“I never said even ’til I got done in 2016 doing it, take the points. We never put the point spread up. Every score was always at least a field goal off of the spread. I left no doubt. I would use words like much closer than expected or an upset or this could be ugly. I would never put 50-10, but 30-13, just so the teams wouldn’t get completely pissed at me if I picked them to lose in a blowout. It was subtle, it was quietly accepted because I never crossed those lines.

“Nobody said ‘Can’t do this’. It was fun. If it was two defensive teams, I’d put up 3-2 sometimes. We aren’t over-undering this. We are just having a good time.” 

Continue Reading

Sports Online

The Athletic Dropped From Trevor Bauer Lawsuit

“We welcome the court’s dismissal of claims against The Athletic. We continue to believe that Knight’s tweets were non actionable.”

blank

Published

on

blank

The Athletic has been dropped as a defendant in a lawsuit filed by MLB pitcher Trevor Bauer after reporter Molly Knight tweeted incorrect statements in regards to Bauer’s legal troubles after being accused of violent sexual encounters with a California woman.

In 2021, Knight tweeted that it was “not possible to consent to a fractured skull” after reports surfaced of what Bauer had done to his alleged victim during a sexual episode. The accuser did not suffer a fractured skull, court documents show.

U.S. District Court Judge Michael Fitzgerald dismissed The Athletic as a defendant in the case, but did say Bauer can amend his lawsuit to continue to include Knight. The judge claimed Knight’s tweets “favors that a reasonable reader could conclude that the tweets implied an asserted fact.”

In a statement, The New York Times — which now owns the online publication after purchasing it in January of this year — said they agreed with the decision.

“We welcome the court’s dismissal of claims against The Athletic,” The Times told Front Office Sports. “We continue to believe that Knight’s tweets were non actionable.”

Continue Reading

Sports Online

Bomani Jones: I’m Better At Talking About Political, Social Issues Than Most In Sports Media

“I personally am better at talking about those things than most people who work in this industry. Like I feel like I can say that fairly and then it not really be an arrogant thing.”

Jordan Bondurant

Published

on

blank

Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James found himself in a few headlines last week when he questioned reporters for not asking him about the recent Washington Post story and photo surrounding Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, and ESPN commentator Bomani Jones took the opportunity to discuss the revelation.

Jones was pictured as a 14 year old among a crowd during an early stage of integration of public schools in Arkansas during the civil rights movement.

LeBron pointed out that he would field questions when there’s a controversy surrounding a Black person and spoke about the situation with former Cavaliers teammate Kyrie Irving, but he found it curious that no one had asked his opinion on the Jerry Jones story. LeBron had long considered himself a Cowboys fan, but in recent years he’s stopped supporting the team over Jones’ mandate that Dallas players stand for the National Anthem.

On his ESPN podcast The Right Time, host Bomani Jones talked about LeBron and circled it around to how he and other ESPN personalities caught a ton of flack for speaking about political or societal issues that often don’t fall within the confines of sports.

Jones said that being able to talk about political and societal issues comes easier to him than it does to most members of the sports media.

“I personally am better at talking about those things than most people who work in this industry,” Jones said. “Like I feel like I can say that fairly and then it not really be an arrogant thing.”

Jones said it comes down to the fact that there’s a bias at play. Are people going to take offense to what you’re saying because they disagree, or are they going to like what you’re going to say because they agree?

“They’re reinforcing the fact that you’re reinforcing what it is that you want to hear,” Jones said. “But the truth is that most people are not qualified to talk about these things before the world, because talking about these things before the world is very, very difficult.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

blank

Advertisement blank

Barrett Media Writers

Copyright © 2022 Barrett Media.